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Good Life Garden -- The Garden

In Season

The Good Life Garden aims to educate the public on how to buy and plant seasonal vegetables for the best taste and highest nutritional content. Each season the garden's planting list will be available online along with information on how to grow, harvest, buy, and cook the various plants, herbs, and fruits found in the garden.

the garden

The Good Life Garden contains an ever-changing edible landscape, which features organic and sustainably grown vegetables, herbs and flowers accompanied by compelling food and health educational signage for the benefit of faculty, students, staff, and visitors.

fall/winter plants

artichoke

artichoke

Cynara scolymus
The common name comes from the Italian word cocali
which means pinecone. learn more>>>

barley

barley

Hordeum vulgare
Winter barley is a cool season annual that helps prevent erosion...learn more>>>

basil

basil

Ocimum basilicum
Basil is a member of the tropical genus Ocimum, which originated in Africa and was domesticated in India. There are around 165 species in this genus, several of which are eaten. learn more>>>

beets

beets

Beta vulgaris
Beets owe their bright red color to betacyanin, which also acts as a potent cancer fighter. learn more>>>

cabbage

cabbage

Brassica oleracea
Cabbage has been cultivated for centuries in Eastern Europe and Asia Minor. It was one of the most praised vegetables by the ancient Romans who believed it was produced by the sweat of Jupiter. learn more>>>

calendula

calendula

Calendula officinalis
Calendula is an edible flower that also goes by the name of souci, marybud, bulls eye, garden marigold, holligold, pot marigold, and common marigold. learn more>>>

carrots

carrots

Daucus carota
Cultivated white during classical times, and yellow in medieval times, carrots did not get their trademark color until they were bred by farmers in the 17th century to honor the royal Dutch House of Orange. learn more>>>

celery

celery

Apium graveolens
A cool season crop, celery is partially hardy to frosts and light freezes. For best results give celery rich, moist soil that drains well. learn more>>>

chard

chard

Beta vulgaris
A member of the beet family, vitamin C rich chard was chosen for its meaty stems, although ancient Romans cultivated the plant for its roots as well. learn more>>>

crimson clover

crimson clover

Trifolium incarnatum
Crimson clover is planted in the garden as a cover crop. Cover crops are an essential part of any vegetable garden. Acting as a balancing agent, they return to the soil what was lost during harvest by converting air and sun into organic matter. learn more>>>

fennel

fennel

Foeniculum vulgare
One cup of raw, sliced fennel supplies almost 20% of the Daily Value for vitamin C and over 10% of fiber needs all for only 25 calories. learn more>>>

greens

greens

The garden is home to three different types of greens this year: arugula, mizuna and shungiku. learn more>>>

Jerusalem sage

Jerusalem sage

Phlomis fruticosa
Also native to the Mediterranean, Jerusalem sage does well in the heat and dry weather of the Central Valley. It is resistant to oak root fungus, and should be cut back by ½ in the fall to keep it compact.. learn more>>>

kale

kale

Brassica oleracea
With its deep green leaves and sturdy stalks, kale is loaded with a compound called xeathanthin, which has been shown to help prevent age-related loss of vision. It is a source of calcium, and rich in beta carotene, vitamin K, vitamin C, and lutein. learn more>>>

leeks

leeks

Allium porrum
Different varieties of leeks can be harvested practically year round with early varieties ready to harvest from early to mid-fall. Mid season varieties are ready from early to mid winter and late season varieties can be harvested in early to mid spring. learn more>>>

lettuce

lettuce

Lactuca sativa
Garden lettuce is thought to be a selected variety of Lactuca serriola, found throughout Europe, Asia, and North Africa. It is believed to have been first cultivated in Egypt but was also a favorite amongst the Greeks. learn more>>>

Mexican tarragon

Mexican tarragon

Tagetes lucida
The dried leaves and flowers are brewed into a tea traditionally used for colic and malaria. Used as a poultice for rattlesnake bites and ceremonially by native peoples in Central-Southern Mexico.. learn more>>>

Meyer lemon

Meyer lemon

Citrus meyerii
This hardy member of the citrus family only arrived in the United States in 1908 when it was imported from China by Frank Meyer. learn more>>>

green olives

olives

Olea europaea
Olives grow well in poor soils, full sun and heat. Moderate irrigation will increase fruit size and improve oil quality, although olives can survive with very little irrigation once established. learn more>>>

parsley

parsley

Petroselinium crispum
Similar to its present day use to mask garlic breath, vitamin C packed parsley was made into garlands by ancient Romans to disguise unpleasant odors at banquets.. learn more>>>

pomegranate

pomegranate

Punica granatum
The internal structure of pomegranates is unlike any other fruit with its randomly arranged clusters of seeds separated by white membranes. Botanists have even given pomegranates their own family in the plant kingdom, Punica granatum. learn more>>>

radishes

radishes

Raphanus sativus
t is suggested that radishes were held to great esteem in ancient Greece where, at the Temple of Delphi, their likeness was modeled out of gold as an offering to Apollo. learn more>>>

rudbeckia

rudbeckia

Rudbeckia hirta
This flower goes by many common names: black-eyed Susan, brown Betty, brown daisy, brown-eyed Susan, ghloriosa daisy, golden Jerusalem, poorland daisy, yellow daisy, yellow ox-eye and is a flowering plant in the family Asteraceae .learn more>>>

sage

sage

Salvia officianalis
The sage family has over 750 species, consisting of annuals, biennials, perennials, herbs, shrubs and sub-shrubs, and can be found throughout the world. learn more>>>

snapdragon

snapdragon

Antirrhinum majus
The name antirrhinum is dervied from the Greek anti meaning "like", rhis meaning "nose", and inus meaning "of", which probably refers to the nose-like shape of the flower. learn more>>>

thyme

thyme

Thymus vulgaris
There are many different types of thyme --- 60-70 species of the timy-leaf Mediterranean varieties and just as many (if not more) of the common thyme, which is planted in the Good Life Garden. learn more>>>

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Sources:
Health and nutritional content provided by Liz Applegate, Director of Sports Nutrition, UC Davis. www.lizapplegate.com
McGee, Harold. On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. Scribner: New York, 2004.
Biggs, Matthew, Jekka McVicar and Bob Flowerdew. Vegetables, Herbs and Fruit: an Illustrated Encyclopedia. Firefly Books: New York, 2006.
Specific varietal information provided by Seeds of Change. www.seedsofchange.com